Frustration, how it can breed hate

Yesterday when I spoke to my mother she was truly fed up and it got me thinking about how a big contribution failed service delivery and inapt AA and BEE candidates made towards white on black racism in South Africa.

So, a little bit of history to explain where I am coming from on this.

The Old Lady gave about 30 years of her life to hundreds of children teaching maths, 10 years at white schools, and 20 at a black school.  Before she retired, the Education Department told her she would be getting X on a monthly basis, but it turned out that she is now getting Y, and the difference is big, being a lot less than she budgeted on.

Today she can’t come right with the Education Department’s “helpful” staff, because none are willing to really do something about her problem or are just to incompetent to do something about it, and that accompanied by the Mangaung Municipality’s dodgy water and electricity readings are driving her up the walls to the point where she, as a liberal aunty who always taught me to have respect and understand for people of all colours and social standing are making racial slurs.

She NEVER used the “K-Word”, and she even scolded me something fierce when I popped out of my car and shouted obscenities to taxi drivers who think they are above the law for some strange reason and drive on the shoulder of the road while the rest of us law abiding commuters are stuck in traffic, sometimes kicking up small boulders that chip windows and dent panels.

Well, never, until her trouble started with the above mentioned government, and partially government owned institutions.

I myself have experienced it, loads of times, especially when you go into Pretoria central and you see the inefficient way things are being done at the State departments, and it is always a mission to get something done.

I then realised how through a failed policy the Government helped to polarise the country.  Instead of decent skills transfer the ANC lead Government choose to get rid of the skilled people as quick as possible and to get their Cadre deployment up and running because of the promises they made, it was first noticeable in State departments and then it spread to the private sector in the form of AA and BEE.

Simply, most of the people who now were in control did not have the skills to deliver services or maintain the existing infrastructure, and to top it all off they literary raped the Education System to churn out less than desirable candidates who were, until recently fed utter rubbish in the form of propaganda from a certain Youth League that they are entitled to the riches of the land by becoming party members, and not by working for it.

It breaks my heart to hear my Mom utter those words, but, she is running into a wall of bureaucracy, with all the people she turns to being black and not willing to help her out once and for all, and having had the same type of issue before with Home Affairs I can understand how this can breed hate and resentment.

Bottom line is, we need to educate our people, each and every one of them, give them a decent upbringing as far as possible, and get rid of teachers who are only in it for the money, then we can produce a new generation with more than sufficient skills to run a country and who will not be fooled by empty promises by the crooked spin doctors who are now in the foreground of South African politics.

This will most definitely close the gap in the racial divide and smother the breeding ground of hate, not only on one side, but on both.

Knowledge is power, and in gaining knowledge our minds will be set free, and we will be able to build an efficient country delivering more than just basic services to everyone!

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Racism – The Easy Choice

We, as a Rainbow Nation were off to such a good “restart” after the 1994 elections; but sadly it looks like our Rainbow Nation might be just as racially polarised as it was before then, or it might be worse, but everyone is so politically correct that it is sickening.

I  count myself as one of the lucky ones, I escaped most indoctrination from the then National Party government, my mother was liberal, having coloured friends, whom she still has today, 30 odd years later, and my father was way too liberal for my liking since he supported the ANC movement’s goals.

My young mind was stimulated with all types of information in the form of books, television and sounds thanks to my wonderful parents.  I remember spending my younger years running around outside, dashing into the house for a quick refill when my stomach was running on empty, teasing our then maid, now domestic worker Xaba and having a quick chat with her about where she was staying, about her kids, about school, about everything really, then dashing out to play outside again.

I was taught to “Live and let live” and to treat people, regardless of race or social standing with respect, and I could see it through the way my folks and my grandparents treated people.

To this day I live with fond memories of watching the Shaka Zulu series on TV, I remember singing We are Growing by Margaret Singana over and over while practising my warriors stance outside with a self made spear and a dustbin’s lid as a shield, I remember crying my eyes out when his two brothers killed him … I remember listening to Mango Grove’s funky pop songs with their heavy African inspired sounds.

Given, through the years I have also succumbed to the odd racial outburst and I am by no means innocent, but this was mostly due to frustration, where I would say “Fok die kaffirs” when I read about a white woman who was raped, or a white family who were slaughtered, or when I read about the corruption or something as “trivial” as animal abuse.

But then, then I remember.  I remember who I am, what I’ve been taught, and how fascinated I was with the black African cultures and Kings of days gone by; I was so impressed by their sense of nobility and bravery.  I remember and I realise what was taken from my fellow African brethren, and I remember all the good black Africans that I have met through my life, I remember that I’ve read the same type of articles in the Sowetan which reminded me that violence, murder and barbarism doesn’t only target a victim of a specific ethnic group.

Sure, violent hate crimes do happen between the colour divide,  corruption seems to be limited to select few of politically and economically connected elite,  but by judging the whole ethnic group on the actions on a corrupt few out of the 50 million odd people staying in South Africa would be to take the easy way out.

That goes for both sides of the major colour divide here in South Africa.

It is way too easy to blame a whole group than to tackle a specific problem, with specific culprits it seems, and I blame the lack of exposure to different communities and cultures along with a lack of education on both sides of the fence.

I could have easily become a white fanatical zombie after a 9mm got shoved into my face by a black man, but I didn’t, and for this I would like to thank my folks for the tolerance, understanding and compassion for my fellow human being which the instilled in my heart.

Given what I’ve written here I fully stand behind education and the transference of moral fibre between generations, and I will work tirelessly towards given the children of South Africa a chance, because they will be our Rainbow Nation’s salvation.